top of page

The Windstealers

Show:               'The Windstealers'
                          by Jane Madden

Presented by:  Eccles Theatre Group

Venue:              Smock Alley Black Box

Run:                  7th - 13th Septembre 2015

Role:                 Lighting Designer

 

 

Welcome to Ballygweeha,

the windiest town in Ireland!

 

The houses teeter over, the locals walk at an angle into the gusts and no-one’s ever properly lit a fire.

When prodigal son Luc Torney returns after ten years to save the town from ruin with a windfarm scheme, he is hailed as a hero. But town layabout Jacinta Nangle smells a rat. A cast of gurriers, property developers and mammies collide in this modern Irish satire on corruption and national character.

 

Not only does it offer a twist on Irish comedy tradition, satirizes a culture of political apathy and challenges a romantic notion of Irish people as rebellious and anti-authoritarian and but also promises a unique spectacle.  The Windstealers is a robustly physical production with elements of magic realism and political satire. 

 

Imagine "It's Martin's Life" meets Ibsen, meets Bjork's designers. 

In a hurricane. 

 

Creative team:

 

Writer - Jane Madden 

Director - Anushka Senanayake

Producer - Joanna Crawley

Set Designer - Ger Clancy

Sound Designer - Dylan Tonge Jones

Costume Designer - Mary Sheehan

Lighting Designer - Hanna Bowe 

Movement Director - Monika Bieniek

Artwork - Ola Cieslak

 

 

Performers:

 

Christiane O’Mahony

Colin Campbell

Rory Corcoran

Lloyd Cooney

Katie Honan

Alan Mc Mahon

Roseanna Purcell

Jim Byrne_Cast Lloyd Cooney_Colin Campbell
Jim Byrne_Cast Alan Mahon_Katie Honan
Jim Byrne_Cast Katie Honan_Rory Corcoran_Lloyd Cooney_Colin Campbell_Alan Mahon_Christiane OMahony_R
Jim Byrne Photos_Cast Katie Honan and ensamble
Jim Byrne_Cast Roseanna Purcell Katie Honan_Alan Mahon
Jim Byrne_Cast Katie Honan_Alan Mahon_Christiane OMahony_Colin Campbell_Rory Corcoran_Lloyd Cooney
Jim Byrne_Cast Katie Honan 2

Images provided by Jim Byrne (www.jimbyrnephoto.com)

September 08, 2015

The Irish Times - An exuberant satiric romp

No one is spared, be they on the make or on the dole: the sideswipes are gentle but ecumenical, for politicians, bankers, developers, overbearing mothers and whingers. This is an ambitious project and a great vehicle for the ensemble cast of seven (mostly recent graduates from the Lir Academy), who are immaculate and hilarious.

September 09, 2015

The Reviews Hub - TIGER DUBLIN FRINGE: The Windstealers

Tell people more about t“Any work today? Any work yesterday? Any work tomorrow?” In Jane Madden’s raucous satire on modern Irish society and corruption, you think you know the answer to all three questions before they’re given. Only the last question isn’t answered with another no, but “Fuckin’ hope not,” delivered with a half-hearted laugh.

September 09, 2015

Broadway World - The Bust in a Gust

When the going gets tough, the tough develop a wind-resistant, sidestep shuffle. In Ballygweeha, the fictional Irish gale-town in Jane Madden's brilliant farce, locals have a slanted view of the world, and not just because they're bracing themselves at an angle to stop being lifted away.

September 12, 2015

Hunt & Gather - THE WINDSTEALERS

The town of Ballygweeha is none-too proud to call itself ‘the windiest town in Ireland’. At the opening, the stage is bare but for a single Beckettian, wind-slanted tree. People spend the mornings taking the garden off the roof, as that’s where it ends up after an average blustery night. The townspeople spend their lives walking sideways against the wind in what’s come to be known as the ‘Gweeha Sidle’. Local layabouts have little to do but, well, lay about, half-heartedly complaining about the lack of employment.

September 08, 2015

No More Work Horse - The Windstealers

With a plot spun from the Simpsons ‘Monorail!’ episode glazed into an Irish setting, the play follows the inhabitants of the ‘windiest town in Ireland’ Ballygweeha, a pseudo habitable village at the edge of the world steeped in all the Irish caricatures of a Pat Shortt fever dream. Introduce Luc Torney, native son turned sleazy salesman, returned from the big city with a wind turbine blueprint in one hand, and a fine print riddled contract in the other.

Please reload

bottom of page